Rev. Jacquelyn's Message                
                               
     
I Need You to Survive  
Lyrics by Hezekiah Walker
 
I need you, you need me.  
We're all a part of God's body.  
Stand with me, agree with me.  
We're all a part of God's body.  
 
It is his will, that every need be supplied.  
You are important to me, I need you to survive.  
You are important to me, I need you to survive.  
 
I pray for you, You pray for me.  
I love you, I need you to survive.  
I won't harm you with words from my mouth.  
I love you, I need you to survive.  
 
It is his will, that every need be supplied.  
You are important to me, I need you to survive.
 
 
That song, which we sing, captures the essence of the month of February for our community here at First Church of Religious Science, Vallejo.  The monthly theme for us, as well as for Centers for Spiritual Living member communities around the globe, is "Self Awareness is Not Enough."   
 
February 1 is the third day of the Season for Peace and Nonviolence (SPN), which spans January 30-April 4.  New Thought and other spiritual as well as secular communities around the globe are participating in this 21st year of SPN. Every morning at 7 a.m., for the 64 days of the Season, there is an opportunity to call in and participate in a brief discussion and affirmation, based on the principle for the day; and to consider doing the recommended action step.  The call-in number is: (646) 876-9923, (669) 900-6833 or (408) 638-0968. You can access the Peace Mandala which has the principles, affirmations and action steps at http://www.agnt.org/node/5.     
 
February is also African-American History Month.  In 1915, historian Dr. Carter G. Woodson founded the Association for the Study of African-American Life and History.  This organization inaugurated the first formal acknowledgement of African-Americans' place in U.S. History by designating the week that included February 12 as "Negro History Week" in 1926.  This week was chosen because February 12 was President Abraham Lincoln's birthday, and February is also the month of famed African-American abolitionist Frederick Douglass' birthday.  The month of February was officially designated as African-American History Month by Congress in 1986.  Like other months that are dedicated to celebrating the contributions of various ethnic and cultural groups to the vreation, growth and development of the United States as a world leader, African-American History Month gives us all an opportunith to fill in the blanks, educate ourselves, our communities and especially our children.  It is an opportunity to tell the Truth about how America became great and to co-create a space where we can colelctively grow into our next greater-yet-to-be.     
 
Metaphysically speaking, Peace and Truth are both Spiritual Principles.  As we stand at a precipice of taking a quantum leap into a future of Spirituality and a morally inclusive, equitable and just society, it is important to make concerted and conscious efforts towards Peace and to own the Truth of our history.  I am reminded of the fuss that was raised when then-First Lady Michelle Obama said in a speech that she "...wakes up every morning in a house built by slaves."  After much denial, it was finally conceded by "noted historians" that, indeed, African-American slaves (each considered at the time as two-thirds a person) built the White House.  Recent movies like Hidden Figures and the much older Men of Honor (2000), chronicle the contributions as well as the racism experienced by the American sheroes and heroes who are also Black.    
 
In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus the Christ says, "Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall set you free." (John 8:32) This quote is toward the end of the section in the chapter where Jesus is declaring the opportunity to accept and live from the inner Christ.  In New Thought we refer to this as Oneness.  Authentic Oneness is based on Truth and Truth telling and teaching, Peace (individual and collective), and Justice.  We are living in an age of revealing and telling the Truth, for the good of the nation and the planet.  African-American History Month is intricately and intimately interwoven in the building and sustaining of our nation.  As we collectively embrace that fact, we set outrselves on a sure course of recognizing and celebrating Oneness through our recognition that each one of us can accurately say, "I need you to survive."  
 
Peace and Blessings,  
Rev. Jacquelyn